‘Improbable: Issues with the God Hypothesis’ – eBook Sale

For the holiday season, I’m offering ‘Improbable’ (Kindle Edition) for only $0.99 on Amazon. Check out the link below to visit the product page!

‘Improbable: Issues with the God Hypothesis’ – Amazon – $0.99

‘God Needs To Go: Why Christian Beliefs Fail’ – Coming soon!

10675598_10152430027557331_160644793908563299_nIn December of 2012, I self-published my first book. It did fairly well, achieving the #4 eBook spot in the atheism category on Amazon, just behind Hitchens and Dawkins. In 2013, while ‘Improbable’ was in the publishing process, I sidelined the book with the hopes I’d return, rework the content, and republish.

Well, I’m happy to announce Atheist Republic will republish ‘God Needs To Go: Why Christian Beliefs Fail’ – coming soon! As more information surfaces, I’ll be quick to update you! Thanks for the support, everyone.

 

Guest Appearance on the Out of The Closet (OOTC) Project

My wife and I were recent guests on the OOTC Project. Hosted by our friends David and Peter, we all sat down, drank, smoked cigarettes and discussed religion, God, love and homosexuality.

Listen here. Follow OOTC Project on Twitter as well!

This is only part one of two, so stay tuned!

Five Podcasts Every Atheist Should Know

“Over a year ago, NatSkep published an article in which I outlined my top 5 atheist podcasts. Since, a number of podcasts have surfaced, bringing with them a wealth of entertainment and information most will surely find comforting, enjoyable, and sobering. This being the case, I feel that it’s important to revisit this topic and revise my previous selections; some may seem familiar, others may not. From a wide range of topics and guest interviews, the atheist will find these podcasts relevant, keeping updated on the latest news and topics from the atheist community. For the theist, who may be looking to better educate themselves regarding atheism and the God debate, look no further. In a world dominated by theistic dogma, these fresh voices of reason offer listeners a pleasant and welcoming picture into a world most of the population is unaware exists. In no particular order, I want to present five that are sure to promise all that I’ve written. So let’s dig right in, shall we?”

Continue reading at Atheist Republic

‘Improbable: Issues with the God Hypothesis’ – Now Available

coverImprobable: Issues with the God Hypothesis is now available on Amazon, in both paperback and eBook formats. Like I stated previously, there were a number of reasons why I decided to self-publish rather than seek-out an alternate publishing company. Aside from an opportunity to restructure and re-edit my book, what I truly wanted was to provide my work at a more affordable price. Thanks to everyone for your support.

Synopsis“Does God exist?” – This question has plagued humanity since its beginning. From the primitive to the sophisticated, human kind has worshipped gods of every shape, gender, size, and creed. One god, however, reigns supreme: The God of Abraham. Giving birth to the three most prevalent monotheistic religions existing today, Yahweh has dominated the theological landscape. A recent intellectual movement has taken place, however, challenging the religious status quo. This movement has given many the right to approach the God hypothesis with skepticism. Improbable: Issues with the God Hypothesis critically examines the claims made by the religious, determining whether a belief in Yahweh is actually as reasonable as long believed.

You can purchase Improbable: Issues with the God Hypothesis at Amazon.

Paperback – $13.05 + S&H  |  Kindle Edition – $2.99

Review of “Why There Is No God: Simple Responses to 20 Common Arguments for the Existence of God”

Recently, Armin Navabi asked that I review his new book. An amazing thorough work, I must say.

Armin Navabi does an amazing job eviscerating the God claim. Using evidence and logic, Navabi addresses almost every topic associated with the idea that God “exists.” He wonderfully details the position of atheism with clear and concise language. Many other books detail the arguments of atheism, but rarely do they match the approachable style Navabi shows in this book. We as atheists find ourselves often in debate with theists regarding scripture, origins, morality, and prayer; all of these things are covered thoroughly.

My path to atheism was a long one. Once I came to my conclusion, I wanted to discuss the topic with as many theists as possible. This book would’ve certainly helped my growth as a young atheist. Do not disregard this book if you think you “know everything” about atheism. It’s an amazing work worth the read.

Purchase ‘Why There Is No God: Simple Responses to 20 Common Arguments for the Existence of God’ at Amazon in paperback and Kindle.

Armin Navabi reviews ‘Improbable’

Recently, Armin Navabi (Founder of Atheist Republic and author of ‘Why There Is No God: Simple Responses to 20 Common Arguments for the Existence of God‘) reviewed ‘Improbable: Is There Any Reason To Believe In God?‘:

“Improbable is a book that seeks to challenge its readers’ concepts of religion, faith, and the monotheistic conventions they may have blindly accepted in the past. Thankfully, it does so with class, panache, straight talk, and scientifically based supporting evidence to back up its points.

Brucker tackles the toughest concepts that many of us wrestle with in making the decision on how we’re going to look at faith going forward in our lives. Discussed are intelligent design (or lack thereof), moral implications, and the alternative explanations for our universe.

While Brucker is respectful in his approach and doesn’t lambaste the faithful as idiots, he also doesn’t skirt the issue or qualify his suppositions. This straightforward style makes the book feel honest.

Regardless of your starting point, Brucker’s insights are inarguably thought-provoking and worth consideration for both the religious and nonreligious, but would be better swallowed by someone already on the path to non-faith.”

The review can be found on Amazon.

A Call for Reason

“It is important that we recognize the divide between the natural world and the spiritual world. One’s built on evidence gathered by qualified individuals, done so after vigorous study. The other’s founded on assumptions that bear little to no confirmatory evidence. As it stands today, one seems to rule supreme over the world’s population. While figuring in the amount of scientific and cultural progress that has taken place, it is quite shocking to see that people still indulge in such stifling concepts. Christian theism has and may continue to contribute to the degradation of educated inquiry.”

Continue reading on Atheist Republic.

 

‘You Say That I Am: Jesus and the Messianic Problem’ by Matthew O’Neil

downloadAuthor Matthew O’Neil delivers a look into the past of Christianity with You Say That I Am: Jesus and the Messianic Problem. Thousands and thousands of denominations of Christianity exist globally, all with a different idea of Christ and what it means to be a Christian. All aspects of Christ’s life are discussed within the pages of this phenomenal book; from the origin of Christianity to the veracity of the current Gospels. The book is a compelling case for the existence of a man named Jesus and a case against a divine demigod. I’ve read the works of Carrier and Price, but after reading O’Neil’s book, I certainly believe it is time to revisit my position.

I’ve gotten to know O’Neil over the past few months and can attest to his sincerity and conviction. While he and I may not see eye-to-eye on the existence of Jesus, he certainly gives me the knowledge I need to question whether or not I am correct. Though I still may not feel as though enough evidence supports the claim of a living proselytizer, O’Neil gives comfort to those who do. Some within the atheist community do feel that if they accept that Christ actually lived, they’ve lost the argument against Christianity; O’Neil not only lends credence to the existence of Christ, he decimates the claim of divinity.

Continue reading ‘You Say That I Am: Jesus and the Messianic Problem’ by Matthew O’Neil